From the Collection: Untitled (Owl and Cherry Branch)

2005-176

This Japanese woodblock print by Hirose Bihō joined the collection in 2005. Very little is known about the artist Bihō (born 1873) except that he was a designer of kachō-e, or “animal and flower pictures.” In many of his known works, he experiments with bokashi, the gradient effect in the background and on the owl’s chest. This print is signed “Bihō” at lower left and bears the artist’s seal.

image source: Untitled (Owl and Cherry Branch)

Monday Morning Muse: Head of a Girl

1955-187This charcoal drawing of a young girl by American illustrator Harrison Fisher joined the collection in 1955. Fisher began his career as a newspaper and magazine illustrator and became particularly known for his drawings of women, which appeared regularly on the cover of Cosmopolitan magazine from the early 1900s until his death in 1934. (source)

To read more about the life and work of Harrison Fisher, visit the National Museum of American Illustration artist’s webpage.

image source: Head of a Girl, Suzanna Bruyant

 

From the Collection: Traci & Steve

steve and traci

These eccentric prints by contemporary American artist Beth Van Hoesen joined the collection in 2012.  Traci (left) and Steve (right)  are the only two compositions that Beth Van Hoesen realized as prints from her series of drawings “Punks.” Van Hoesen executed these drawings in the 1980s and early ‘90s, finding her subjects in the Castro District of San Francisco, where she lived in a former firehouse.

Fellow artist Joseph Goldyne, who interviewed Van Hoesen in 2009, asserts that “Punks” represents some of her finest work. Better-known for her animal and flower subjects, Van Hoesen approached all her subjects with the same attention to differentiating details. Goldyne suggests that her interest in punks and animals was analogous: “She was fascinated by the same panoply of color in these kids as she was in the orchestrations of color she found in roosters or vultures or parrots. She seemed to love to draw things that were, in and of themselves, composed already”—like Traci with her geisha-esque makeup and hot-pink hair and Steve with his sculpted hair and prominent tattoo.

image sources: Traci / Steve